How To Evict A Mobile Home From My Land?

How To Evict A Mobile Home From My Land

If you have a mobile home on your property and want to get rid of it, there are some things that you need to know. 

The first thing you should do is contact the landowner if they’re not you!

If they refuse then there may be ways around this such as notifying the local government or even contacting an attorney for help.

If you want to evict a mobile home from your land, you must get in touch with an attorney who specializes in this area of law.

There are many things to consider when doing so and they will be able to answer any questions you might have about the process.

You may also need to contact local authorities or even a judge for them to issue an eviction notice. We can help with all of these steps!

10 Steps to evict a mobile home

Obtain a land owner’s permission and ensure you have the necessary documentation.

Most people don’t realize that mobile homes on private property can be treated as if they were tenants living in traditional housing units.

This means that they will need to be given proper notice before their eviction, just like any other tenant.

So first contact the owner of the mobile home and see if they’re willing to leave or not. If not then there are ways around this such as contacting local authorities or even an attorney for help.

We can help with all of these steps!

1. Secure necessary documentation

You must get in touch with an attorney who specializes in this area of law. 

There are many things to consider when doing so and they will be able to answer any questions you might have about the process. 

You may also need to contact local authorities or even a judge for them to issue an eviction notice.

2. Contact County Health Department

In many cases, a mobile home must be connected to a sewer system and have a proper septic tank.

Your county may require that you upgrade your septic or sewer system to accommodate a mobile home on your land. 

The local health department will inspect the site and let you know if they feel it is safe for the home to remain on the property.

3. Contact your insurance company about liability coverage

If you want to evict a mobile home from your land, you must get in touch with an attorney who specializes in this area of law.

There are many things to consider when doing so and they will be able to answer any questions you might have about the process.

You are not required to have liability insurance on your mobile home if it is placed on someone else’s property, but you should never operate without it.

The cost is minimal, and the protection you gain is invaluable. If something happens to the mobile home or its contents while it’s parked on your land, you don’t want to be liable.

4. Contact your mortgage company

You may choose not to tell your mortgage company that there is now a dwelling (a mobile home) on the property where your house used to stand-remember that lying to creditors is never a good idea, and could lead to more problems down the road.

5. Contact your neighbors

If your mobile home isn’t currently on their property-and won’t be anytime soon-then there’s no reason for them to know anything at all about what you’re planning (unless, of course, they plan on building new homes on their land, in which case you’ll have to get their permission). 

They may resent the idea of being forced into a more crowded neighbourhood without being asked for their opinion.

6. Get the forms that you need from local authorities

You will most likely need to acquire specific paperwork from your county clerk, zoning board or attorney.

These forms may include specific legal notices and/or eviction papers required by state law. You must get in touch with an attorney who specializes in this area of law.

7. Be aware of deadlines and legal requirements

Steps to Evict A Mobile Home

Get the forms that you need from local authorities and/or your attorney and follow the state law exactly as it is written. 

Do not try and skip ahead, do not put anything off. You may be tempted to plead ignorance if things go wrong, but this is no defence!

Follow the rules accurately; otherwise, your mobile home will remain where it sits permanently.

8. Get permission from your insurance for a vacant site…

If there are no buildings present on your property then chances are that they won’t ask for proof that you have insurance coverage for the vacant site-it’s likely not necessary where there’s nothing worth insuring!

However, once there’s something new on the site-like a mobile home-you will need insurance.

Contact your insurance company to make sure you have the appropriate coverage in place before moving forward.

9. Get your mobile home onto your property

You may not want to rent a storage space for the time being if it’s only going to be there for a short period of time-like until the eviction is complete and you’ve had a chance to build or move into your new house. 

Also Read: How To Get A Permit To Move A Mobile Home?

You should keep all receipts for anything that you buy while the mobile home is sitting on your land, including items like lumber and building materials, since you will need them when it’s time to develop.

10. Move out!

It might seem odd that we haven’t talked about this step until now, but there are so many things that need to be done before you can evict a mobile home from your land, that it makes sense to wait until the end of the process.

Can I abandon a mobile home?

That depends on the state. In California, the law says that a mobile home must be hooked up to utilities in order for it to be considered “dwelling unit.” So if you take off with your mobile home and don’t hook it up, you’re probably going to look like a squatter rather than an owner.
In Washington State, you can leave a mobile home behind as long as the lot is paid for and no fees are owed.
It’s not clear if abandoned trailers here count as a dwelling unit or not.
That may depend on whether they’ve been hooked up to the sewer system or if there is any other evidence of habitation such as fresh water lines or electricity running from another source.

How do I evict someone from my land?

You need to file a “Complaint for Removal of Person from Real Property” in the local superior court.
There are particular things that must be included in order for you to legally evict someone from land without their consent. This is called a “forcible entry and unlawful detainer.”
In California, if your property includes a mobile home, you can only evict the person named on the title of the home.
A tenant whose name doesn’t appear on the deed does not need to be notified before an eviction can take place.

Conclusion

I hope this has helped you understand how to evict a mobile home from my land.

If not, then hire a mobile home eviction specialist.

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